remagine:

From the top: Infographic (2009) by Ross Crooks via mint; Infographic (2009) from the NY Times and Cool Infographic; Photo of Tom Curley, retiring Associated Press CEO in an interview with Joe Strupp.

The Big News this year - 2012 - and since 2008 … is NEWS, from the forecasting of a gloomy future of print newspapers in 2008, as the US-based infographics shows, to a new obsession (healthy?) with a consuming of the news that engulfs our lives, and the shifting of news”paper” industry to digital. Various sources report:

According to Monocle’s culture editor, Robert Bound:

“Now, what was there more of in 2011 than in any other year in history? What was the gift that kept on giving, often after you wished it wouldn’t? News. There was so much news that people were insulating their lofts with footage from Benghazi, throwing another log of Greek debt on the fire and blaming freshly fallen reports from the London riots on getting into work late, as if it were a freak snowstorm. The amount of man-hours lost to industry due to news-sickness was in the hundreds of billions of euros (possibly).

In 2012, it’s almost certain that lots of things, again, will happen and we’ll be there sucking it up like a race of bulletin-devouring Dysons, a master-race of greedy Henry the Hoovers, gurgling on the carpet-fluff of eurozone squabbles and football gossip. We’re all going to be watching the news, all year. That’s all we have left: an endless cycle of news, fresh from the wires, squiggling at us through the Twittersphere and rolling down the mountain from the again-mighty news organisations. News will be coming at us like a besuited and coiff-haired bullet; we’re going to be wiping squashed news remnants off our radiator grille as we just try to get somewhere safe, somewhere where they don’t know what the outcome of the Egyptian elections is likely to be and are ignorant of who’s topping the medal table in London’s Olympics.

So invest in the news. Make some of your own, perhaps. Pick it, pickle it, bottle it, sell it. With debts, crises, crashes, riots, elections, dictators-a-toppling, nominees-a-running and sprinters-a-running, there’s a rich seam of this gold-rush stuff that could have your name on it.

via Monocle

So agrees retiring Associated Press CEO, Tom Curley:

“The market for news traditionally defined is growing, it’s stronger than ever, there are more people engaged with news more times a day and in more countries than ever before. The overall market is strong. The challenge is the revenue side and how to raise revenues. There’s obviously a shifting taking place. Some of that shift has involved sending money from traditional media to web players so we all have to figure out what relevance means for the news world.”

via what’s next: innovation in newspapers and jimromenesko

More news about newspapers:

“Paper houses - USA [Property]

During the bleakest years for American downtowns in the 1970s and 1980s newspapers were often among the only big-city businesses not to flee to the suburbs. But now, as the media business quivers and downtown property becomes more desirable, iconic newspaper headquarters are increasingly attractive prospects for developers looking to convert the well-located sturdy buildings for new uses.”

Read more on Monocle

And a bookshop bucking the trend: Tsutaya Books, Tokyo, (via Monocle).

What Clay Shirky has to say about “Newspaper, Paywalls and Core Users”. One of the better quotes is “form follows funding”.

remagine:

From the top: Infographic (2009) by Ross Crooks via mint; Infographic (2009) from the NY Times and Cool Infographic; Photo of Tom Curley, retiring Associated Press CEO in an interview with Joe Strupp.

The Big News this year - 2012 - and since 2008 … is NEWS, from the forecasting of a gloomy future of print newspapers in 2008, as the US-based infographics shows, to a new obsession (healthy?) with a consuming of the news that engulfs our lives, and the shifting of news”paper” industry to digital. Various sources report:

According to Monocle’s culture editor, Robert Bound:

“Now, what was there more of in 2011 than in any other year in history? What was the gift that kept on giving, often after you wished it wouldn’t? News. There was so much news that people were insulating their lofts with footage from Benghazi, throwing another log of Greek debt on the fire and blaming freshly fallen reports from the London riots on getting into work late, as if it were a freak snowstorm. The amount of man-hours lost to industry due to news-sickness was in the hundreds of billions of euros (possibly).

In 2012, it’s almost certain that lots of things, again, will happen and we’ll be there sucking it up like a race of bulletin-devouring Dysons, a master-race of greedy Henry the Hoovers, gurgling on the carpet-fluff of eurozone squabbles and football gossip. We’re all going to be watching the news, all year. That’s all we have left: an endless cycle of news, fresh from the wires, squiggling at us through the Twittersphere and rolling down the mountain from the again-mighty news organisations. News will be coming at us like a besuited and coiff-haired bullet; we’re going to be wiping squashed news remnants off our radiator grille as we just try to get somewhere safe, somewhere where they don’t know what the outcome of the Egyptian elections is likely to be and are ignorant of who’s topping the medal table in London’s Olympics.

So invest in the news. Make some of your own, perhaps. Pick it, pickle it, bottle it, sell it. With debts, crises, crashes, riots, elections, dictators-a-toppling, nominees-a-running and sprinters-a-running, there’s a rich seam of this gold-rush stuff that could have your name on it.

via Monocle

So agrees retiring Associated Press CEO, Tom Curley:

“The market for news traditionally defined is growing, it’s stronger than ever, there are more people engaged with news more times a day and in more countries than ever before. The overall market is strong. The challenge is the revenue side and how to raise revenues. There’s obviously a shifting taking place. Some of that shift has involved sending money from traditional media to web players so we all have to figure out what relevance means for the news world.”

via what’s next: innovation in newspapers and jimromenesko

More news about newspapers:

“Paper houses - USA [Property]

During the bleakest years for American downtowns in the 1970s and 1980s newspapers were often among the only big-city businesses not to flee to the suburbs. But now, as the media business quivers and downtown property becomes more desirable, iconic newspaper headquarters are increasingly attractive prospects for developers looking to convert the well-located sturdy buildings for new uses.”

Read more on Monocle

And a bookshop bucking the trend: Tsutaya Books, Tokyo, (via Monocle).

What Clay Shirky has to say about “Newspaper, Paywalls and Core Users”. One of the better quotes is “form follows funding”.

Posted 2 years ago 1 note

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